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New Orleans Opera presents Verdi’s Macbeth

Absent from its stage for 22 years, Verdi’s Macbeth returned to the New Orleans Opera this past weekend for two performances (November 11 and 13 to be exact). As it came to pass, your friends at newoutpost just happened to be in town on unrelated business and invariably asked “What better way to cap the most intense and distasteful presidential campaign in our lifetime than to simmer in the dark world of Macbeth?” In fact, we had to see it twice. This marks newoutpost’s first operatic venture in New Orleans, a city with a celebrated operatic history (Patti, Sontag, they were all here) and hard hit by the aftermath of hurricane Katrina. Eleven years later, we’re happy to report that the company has made significant headways out of the shadows, and its 2016-17 season marks the return of the company’s tradition of offering four operas per season.

Lady Macbeth (Brenda Harris) and Macbeth (Michael Chioldi) face the emotional consequences of their actions following the murder of King Duncan. Photo by Tom Grosscup.

Lady Macbeth (Brenda Harris) and Macbeth (Michael Chioldi) face the emotional consequences of their actions following the murder of King Duncan. Photo by Tom Grosscup.

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Posted by on November 14, 2016 in Arts, Opera

 

The Atlanta Opera presents Mozart’s Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail

The Atlanta Opera opened its 2016-17 season this past Saturday October 8th with a delightful presentation of Mozart’s singspiel Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail. Though the opera does not enjoy top tier status in the international repertoire, it has been championed by the Atlanta Opera company twice before, and the opera’s 2006 production even marked the company’s first (and to this day, only) pre-recorded broadcast for local radio. For the present run, the company has assembled a delightful (if uneven) cast and a production that brings the opera to life in a gracious and charming way.  The company should also be credited for reaching out to those in need, for as a gesture of solidarity towards our coastal neighbors facing the harrowing threat of Hurricane Matthew, it welcomed refugees seeking shelter in our city to the performance at no charge. We can only hope that those facing hardships were able to find momentary repose in Mozart’s magical score.

Tom Key (Pasha Selim) and Sarah Coburn (Konstanze). Photo by Jeff Roffman

Tom Key (Pasha Selim) and Sarah Coburn (Konstanze). Photo by Jeff Roffman

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Posted by on October 11, 2016 in Arts, Opera

 

The Austin Opera presents Puts’ The Manchurian Candidate

Following the tremendous success of their first operatic collaboration Silent Night, the team of Kevin Puts and Mark Campbell are at it again, offering a riveting operatic adaptation of Richard Condon’s The Manchurian Candidate. The opera debuted in Minnesota in 2015 to great enthusiasm, and premiered regionally at the Austin Opera this past Saturday, September 17 to thunderous ovations. Though Condon’s novel has attained a certain renown through the years, The Manchurian Candidate lives in the minds of the common American mostly through two film adaptations, and while not aiming to dismiss the valiant efforts of one Meryl Streep in the 2004 version, we are happy to report that the opera tends to hail the earlier film in tone and structure most.

AUSTIN, TX - SEPTEMBER 15, 2016 - The Manchurian Candidate by the Austin Opera. (Photo by Erich Schlegel)

AUSTIN, TX – SEPTEMBER 15, 2016 – The Manchurian Candidate by the Austin Opera. (Photo by Erich Schlegel)

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Posted by on September 21, 2016 in Arts, Opera

 

The Atlanta Opera presents Gounod’s Romeo et Juliette

To close its 2015-16 season, The Atlanta Opera tipped its hat to French Grand opera and unveiled a star-studded production of Gounod’s Romeo et Juliette this past Saturday. While all opera is dependent on singers of not only extraordinary technical pedigree but also of a musical understanding of how language informs declamation, Grand French opera relies on the latter more heavily so, making Romeo et Juliette notoriously difficult to cast.   The Atlanta Opera’s first production, which hailed back to 2007, is fondly remembered as an uneven yet valiant effort at revealing the work’s hidden charms. The company’s current effort shares a similar evaluation.

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Acrobats entertain a crowd of Capulets in the Atlanta Opera’s production of Gounod’s Romeo et Juliette. Photo by Jeff Roffman.

 

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Posted by on May 9, 2016 in Arts, Opera

 

Washington Concert Opera presents Donizetti’s La Favorite

On the evening of March 4th, the Washington Concert Opera closed its 2015-16 season with a wildly applauded performance of Donizetti’s grand opera “La Favorite”. Central to the performance’s success was the work of maestro Antony Walker, who remains a tireless champion of the Bel Canto repertoire represented through this unjustly neglected piece. His love for the works of Donizetti in particular, which are routinely vilified by the cognoscenti as unworthy, is particularly disarming, and from the first note of the overture onwards his faith in the dramatic possibilities of this score was palpable. Indeed, through the combined forces of the Washington Concert Opera Orchestra and Chorus he realized the score with the respect and reverence often reserved for Verdi’s middle and later periods. It was a veritable shame that maestro Walker denied us his take on the opera’s extended ballet sequence. By the by, he smartly opted to forgo the familiar, yet deeply flawed Italian translation of the opera in favor of the French original. In the process, he made a compelling case for the reassessment of the opera’s dramatic appeal, as well as reinstating a decidedly French aesthetic which more closely reflect Donizetti’s original conception of the piece when it debuted in Paris in 1840. Lucky for all, maestro Walker surrounded himself with an inspired cast of young artists capable of achieving his vision.

Joelle Harvey (Ines), Kate Lindsey (Leonor) and Javier Arrey (King Alphonse). Photo credit: Don Lassell.

Joelle Harvey (Ines), Kate Lindsey (Leonor) and Javier Arrey (King Alphonse). Photo credit: Don Lassell.

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Posted by on March 7, 2016 in Arts, Opera

 

Washington Concert Opera presents Rossini’s Semiramide

As the nation geared its attention towards the Thanksgiving festivities, Washington Concert Opera ushered the season in style by offering Rossini’s epic opera seria, Semiramide as its season opener. By the time the baton led the final chords on the piece, it was clear that the company had scored a huge success. Throughout the evening, the performance had been enthusiastically received, and at its close the enthralled audience was driven to its feet as the soloists took their final bows. It is difficult to disagree with such a display of public approval, and we will do our best in what follows to explain why your friends at newoutpost heard it somewhat differently.

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Vivica Genaux (Arsace) and Jessica Pratt (Semiramide). Photo by Don Lassell.

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Posted by on November 25, 2015 in Arts, Opera

 

The Atlanta Opera presents Puccini’s La Boheme

The Atlanta Opera opened its 2015-16 season with warmly received, though uneven, performances of Puccini’s eternal masterpiece La Boheme. The new production, the brainchild of General and Artistic Director Tomer Zvulun, promised to once again (his words) reimagine the work for the benefit of today’s audience, a most suspect practice that tends to elicit a great deal of scrutiny from your friends at newoutpost. In order to achieve this, among other things, we are told that the opera’s time period has been updated to the 1890’s, likely for the dazzling costume and stylistic opportunities afforded by the Belle Epoque (which costumer designer Martin Pakledinaz fully exploited). In truth, we are happy to report this as one of Mr. Zvulun’s better efforts, displaying less of the self-serving, intrusive devices (mostly in the form of projections) that have plagued his prior productions, and relegating them to the natural enhancement of the scenic tableau. The slowly rolling clouds above the garret, or the carefully realized terminus leading to the gates of Paris added to the beauty of the proceedings without ever distracting from Puccini’s musical designs. Recalling the excesses from last season’s Madama Butterfly, this was quite the welcomed change.

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Cafe Momus memoires: Top row: Gianluca Terranova (Rodolfo), Maria Luigia Borsi (Mimi), Nicholas Brownlee (Colline), Trevor Scheunemann (Marcello), Leah Partridge (Musetta). Bottom row: Theo Hoffman (Schaunard). Photo by Jeff Roffman for The Atlanta Opera.Photo by Jeff Roffman for The Atlanta Opera

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Posted by on October 15, 2015 in Arts, Opera

 

The Des Moines Metro Opera’s 43 Festival Season

“A highway, a Walmart, and one of the most exciting Summer Opera Festivals in United States.” It is the line I often use when questioning friends marvel at my travel plans as we fill our modest backpacks with all essentials and head to Indianola, Iowa, to attend another season at Des Moines Metro Opera. While New York, Chicago, and San Francisco do feature prominently in our yearly operatic calendar, Des Moines is slowly beginning to attain similar importance to your friends at newoutpost, due solely for its fine musical profile and exciting programing. Traveling to Indianola is certainly not an experience one would suffer if not for DMMO. Following this fourth visit, we can honestly state with some authority that there’s truly not a lot going on in Indianola. The lodging options are minimal, and if you cannot withstand the offerings of what must be some of the saltiest Mexican food to be found in the Midwest, gas station pizza may end up being the next best thing. One imagines Indianola as a perfect location for a remake of Stephen King’s classic “Children of the Corn” after a casual morning stroll through the deserted town square, and for the standard city dweller it takes a bit to adjust. While a pilgrimage to DMMO may be low on glamour, it makes a special call to the operatic nomad not afraid to rough the conditions to experience some of the greatest opera one could hope for from a regional company in the United States, and this is exactly what DMMO manages to present. The brain child of Dr. Robert L. Larsen, the company has made a name for itself by featuring some of the most exciting singers in the country, and paired them with the most promising young talent via its excellent apprentice artist program. At a time when regional companies are either folding or compromising their programing, this courageous company is anything but thriving, all the while propelling each festival season through bold and exciting repertoire which more established companies would struggle to present. Now in its 43rd season, the company presented another crackling lineup: Puccini’s rare gem La Fanciulla del West, Mozart’s delightful Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail, and Janacek’s searing Jenufa. Spoiler alert: This may rank as one of the company’s most solid seasons to date.

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Projection upon the grounds of the Blank Performance Arts Center at night. Photo by Daniel Vasquez

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Posted by on August 3, 2015 in Arts, Opera

 

The Atlanta Opera presents Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro

Moving past the tragedy of Verdi’s Rigoletto, the Atlanta Opera changed gears and delighted audiences with performances of Mozart’s masterpiece “Le nozze di Figaro”, and the company should pride itself in the big success that it proved to be. The dimensions of the piece, though a mainstay of the standard repertoire, are surely daunting for any company: It is a very long opera with a large cast, filled with sprawling dramatic complications and musical pitfalls. Thus it was to the Atlanta Opera’s credit that so much of this presentation struck the right chord, and between the hours of 8 pm and midnight on the performance of April 10, there were many long stretches of time where Mozart lived. The credit belonged to a rather unlikely cast comprised of both young and veteran singers, who were able to bring forth the score’s vitality through their elegant declamation.

Lauren Snouffer (Susanna) and Craig Colclough (Figaro), Photo credit: Jeff Roffman

Lauren Snouffer (Susanna) and Craig Colclough (Figaro), Photo credit: Jeff Roffman

 

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Posted by on April 27, 2015 in Arts, Opera

 

Capitol City Opera presents Mozart’s Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail.

Before I embark in this review of Capitol City Opera’s presentation of Mozart’s Die Entfuhrung aud dem Serail, a story. This is not my first brush with Atlanta’s most notorious fringe opera company. For that we must go back to 1992, a time when I, a self-prescribed boy dramatic soprano, found one of the company’s audition flyers in suburban Dunwoody. I was fifteen, all too aware of my brilliance, and you could not tell me differently. Armed with the unstoppable daring made possible by extraordinary ignorance, I dialed the printed number, only to find myself speaking with Capitol City Opera’s founder herself, Ms. Donna Angel. She listened as I explained my plight as the undiscovered second coming of Salomea Krushelniski (plus the e-flat), and before Ms. Angel had a chance to intervene, I proceeded to back up my statement by letting out a howl that would have silenced the Misippipi Mass Choir. A grave silence was followed by: “I think we could use you. Swing by and audition for us.” Alas, my path to lyric glory would eventually be thwarted by my mother’s inability to locate Wieuca Road on a map (#suburbanissues), yet the story illustrates (as the following review also will), that one never knows what to expect with such fringe companies, and Capitol City Opera is no exception.

William Green as Pedrillo. Photo Credit: Nicholas Cole

William Green as Pedrillo. Photo Credit: Nicholas Cole

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Posted by on April 8, 2015 in Arts, Opera

 
 

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